REPORT

Young people experiencing internet-related mental health difficulties: the benefits and risks of digital skills

Most research on digital skills concerns typically-developing young people. This project asks whether digital skills, as conceptualised by the wider ySKILLS project, improve or undermine the wellbeing of adolescents with lived experience of diverse mental health difficulties such as self-harm, depression and anxiety, eating disorders, excessive internet use, grooming and sexual abuse.

REPORT

Key lessons learned using performance tests to measure digital skills

Report on the development of real-life tasks encompassing information navigation and processing, communication and interaction, and content creation and production skills.

REPORT

Young People’s Digital Skills Practices in Non-formal Learning Contexts

This report is based on findings from a cross-national qualitative study investigating young people’s digital skills practices in non-formal learning contexts in Belgium, Denmark, and Italy. The goal of this study was to gain better knowledge about how to foster digital skills acquisition and practices in non-formal learning contexts.

This study combined 16 observations of digital skills workshops (i.c. programming and robotics workshops), 11 interviews with organisers and moderators of such activities, and 4 subsequent co-design activities with the collaboration of children, organisers, moderators, and researchers.

REPORT

Report on the role of critical information skills in recognising mis- and disinformation

The aim of this study was to gain more insight into young people’s abilities to recognise online mis- and disinformation and into the strategies they used to judge the credibility of this information. To this end, we set up a multimethod study in three countries: Belgium, the Czech Republic and Finland.

LONGITUDINAL DATA COLLECTION

News from the first wave of school survey

Despite the differences among countries on digital penetration, the digital practices, self-reported perceptions of digital skills and awareness of the online world are relatively similar among adolescents. This similarity is shown in the fact sheets and reports that summarise national results.

The dataset of the first wave is available on Zenodo. This document provides the data set and information concerning the first wave of data collection of ySKILLS longitudinal survey items conducted within Task 4.2. in six countries: Estonia, Finland, Germany, Italy, Poland, and Portugal. The aim of Task 4.2. was to develop a robust longitudinal survey to measure both short and medium-term impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) on youth. The data is collected in three waves. The survey focuses on four dimensions of well-being (cognitive, physical, psychological, and social) and several areas related to ICT use. Specifically, the questionnaire is divided into sections. For a detailed overview of each section, see the data dictionary.

Upon first request, users will be granted access to the dataset. As the project is still in progress, and the data collection of the follow-up waves is still ongoing the dataset is not yet open access. Once all survey waves are completed, the dataset is merged and cleaned, and the report on the three waves is published, the data of all waves will be open access.

National reports first wave

QUESTIONNAIRE

This deliverable contains the master questionnaire of the longitudinal survey in English (source language) as well as the languages of the six survey countries: Estonia, Finland, Germany, Italy, Poland and Portugal. All questionnaires were thoroughly prepared by the different ySKILLS partners and tested in the six survey countries (e.g. cognitive tests).

POLICY BRIEF

Towards a Better Understanding of Digital Skills: On Inequalities and Their Impact

This Policy Brief gives an overview of the findings from the second year of the ySKILLS project.

POLICY BRIEF

A Fresh Approach
for Digital Skills
Testing Needed

 Everything nowadays is digital and the COVID-19 pandemic has reinforced this trend. We want children and young people to be digitally skilled. But their digital skills are unequally distributed and this is not without consequences. We need digital skill indicators for individuals in order to be better placed to offer adequate support to those who need it the most. Without appropriate indicators how can we be certain about which areas of digital skills require more attention? Or how can we know which sectors of the population are in most need of support?

REPORT

Digital Skills:
An Inventory of
Actors and Factors

This report will inform the development of digital skills measures that will be validated for children and young people and influence the design of performance testing of ySKILLS. This report will bring a synopsis of the knowledge gained in four tasks performed in the first year of activities of the ySKILLS project (i.e. 2020): the systematic evidence review and a secondary analysis of EU Kids Online data collected in 2017-19 as well as interviews with experts on digital skills in schools and on the labour market and roundtable discussions with children and young people.

REPORT

The Youth Digital Skills Indicator

This report presents the youth Digital Skills Indicator (yDSI), a unique, extensively cross-nationally validated measurement tool with 31 items, distributed over digital skills and digital knowledge questions, that can be used for large-scale population research.

REPORT

Home-school communication on children’s digital skills development. Based on interviews with experts from the education sector

The ySKILLS project seeks to better understand which skills 12- to 17-year-olds must obtain to knowingly and critically use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) for their wellbeing, education and social life, and to improve existing knowledge about how children and youth can build resilience against negative impacts. This report is part of the Work Package 3 ‘Digital Skills: Actors and Factors’ and aims to contribute a deeper knowledge of home-school collaboration in developing digital skills..

REPORT

Digital skills, risks and
wellbeing among European children

This report is based on further analysis of the EU Kids Online data collected across 19 European countries in 2017–19 (Smahel et al., 2020), and aims to identify the antecedents and consequences of digital skills among children. More specifically, in Section 3, “The antecedents of digital skills”, we tested the relationship between individual characteristics (age and gender), social characteristics (socioeconomic status [SES] and parental mediation), country characteristics, information and communications technology (ICT) use and skills.

REPORT

Children’s and young people’s digital skills: a systematic evidence review

Given the considerable policy and practical importance of digital skills and literacies for young people’s life chances, especially as regards inequalities and digital inclusion, and the increasing reliance on digital technologies for learning, employment and civic life, a systematic evidence review was conducted to answer this question.

REPORT

Report on Interviews with Experts on Digital Skills in Schools and
on the Labour Market

The ySKILLS project seeks to better understand which skills 12-17-year-olds must obtain to knowingly, and critically use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) for their wellbeing, education and social life, and to improve existing knowledge as regards how children and youth can build resilience against negative impacts.

Surveys and questionnaires

The youth Digital Skills Indicator: Report on the conceptualisation and development of the ySKILLS digital skills measure

This report presents the youth Digital Skills Indicator (yDSI), a unique, extensively cross-nationally validated measurement tool with 31 items, distributed over digital skills and digital knowledge questions, that can be used for large-scale population research.